One more time. With feeling

I’ve been waiting and waiting for the release of the Nick Cave documentary One More Time with Feeling.

You wait and you wait and then it’s finally released and you find that the only place to rent it digitally is on iTunes.

I hate iTunes.

I hate iTunes because I once made the mistake of trying to rent something from them. It basically didn’t work because of their lack of information on how it works. It didn’t work because APPARENTLY you need a certain amount of free space (WHO KNOWS how much??) to be able to rent from iTunes.

Why. Does. It. Not. Stream? WHY? I rent movies on my iPad all the time; the only time it doesn’t work is with iTunes.

So me and sis get another iPad to rent the damn thing, it has more free space, but no account so we had to set that up. We try to see how much free space is needed, doesn’t say. We’ve got a good 4 GB free. Apparently also not enough.

In the end, sis had to get her computer, install iTunes and create a new account. I’d say it was worth the hassle because the film was good, only, how can something as well-established as iTunes be this difficult to use. HOW? Unacceptable.

As for One More Time with Feeling…I fear I might be biased. I love my Nick Cave documentaries. The Road to God Knows Where is a favorite for sure. (I’ve downloaded it, bought it on VHS and later on DVD, so you know, love.)

I’d like to argue that One More Time.. must be objectively good because my sister really, really enjoyed it. This was her second viewing and she doesn’t even like Nick Cave much. She likes the odd song, but seems fairly uninterested in seeing him live. Which is saying something.

On the other hand…2 minutes in and my brother who was also present declared that it was a load of crap and went home.

Clearly, he lacks references. Clearly, he hasn’t seen Nine Inch Nails’ Closure. I love NIN and all, but that documentary shouldn’t exist. It’s bad. By comparison, One More Time… is a straightforward and extraordinarily clear piece of work.

I would, say in general, documentaries tend to be a bit messy, a bit unclear. But I mean there are levels of hell.

Usually, I don’t like it when they include interviews in documentaries. For many reasons. The stupid lighting and backdrop, the stupid questions, the equally stupid answers (i.e. I’m no fan of the controlled circumstances). None of which is true in this case. The interviews seem spontaneous, natural lighting (by a table next to a window, in a car), the questions, whatever they are, allow for answers that discuss life, that discuss how we view death and grief. And I know it’s not fashionable or popular, but I like Cave’s bleak outlook, his pessimism, his version of and now people go back to work. Because you have to go back to work.

I feel as if the reviews of One More Time… have been slightly off the mark. They’ve made it out as if this is a sad film. That’s not how I understand it. Grief is there and it’s a topic of discussion but I wouldn’t say that’s what it’s about. It’s about recording Skeleton Tree. It’s about going back to work. It’s about having a new understanding of the world as a result of trauma. Or that’s my reading.

I love it that it’s in black and white. I love the way they’ve included the music; such a relief to get nice clean studio versions rather than noisy live recordings. I love it that it was something for me and sis to discuss, that it was open for interpretation.

It did make me want to see the songs off Skeleton Tree played live. Because why wouldn’t it? It’s a beautiful album.

But.

The gig in Sweden is at the Globe. I mean really. Nick Cave is that big now? He’s moved from Annexet to the Globe with this record? I don’t believe it for a second. That and it’s not an appealing venue. Despite there being seats (yes HI I’m old).

How I ever get to any gig ever is nothing short of amazing.