Top Seven Sunday; Instant attraction

I’ve been meaning to finish this post for literally months. It’s really one of the Top Ten Tuesday topics from The Broke and the BookishTop ten things that will make me instantly want to read a book.

I’m just going to ignore the fact that I’m so late the party’s been over for a very, very long time now, and just get on with it anyway. Because I really did like this topic.

And because I’ve already written the post, I know this list does not include 10 things, but rather seven, so let’s keep with the alliteration and just call it what it is.

Disclaimer: I may want to instantly read a book for any of the following reasons, but there are still any number of things that will discourage me a second later.

Norse mythology. I have  a long-going Norse mythology obsession. To be fair, I’m quite interested in mythology in general; what I find most appealing about Norse mythology is that we seem to be missing pieces of the puzzle, it makes little sense at the best of times. Which means you can fill it with content of your choice. I love it when authors take the basic idea of Norse mythology and runs with it. Examples: The Valhalla Saga, Sandman, American Gods.

Music references. Not music in general, specifically music I know and/or love, obviously. This also applies to fictive music, e.g. books set in a music industry context that also manage to be convincing, such as How to kill a rockstar. Other examples: Röta, Eleanor & Park, The Sex Revolts.

University setting. I’m a sucker for university setting. I was even before I started working at uni. Examples: You had me at hello, Rebell med frusna fötter, Fördömd – I also hear Stephen King’s Lisey’s Story is set at uni. I keep meaning to read it for that very reason.

Feminist satire. Is there anything better? Examples: Egalia’s Daughters, Hur man botar en feminist (English: How to cure a feminist), Jag är din flickvän nu (English: I’m your girlfriend now).

Feminist anything. In general. Fiction and non-fiction alike. I will give anything a go, the problem is, there are writers with faulty understanding of what feminism is, i.e. writer and me are not on the same page = they are wrong, and that will make me stop reading. I prefer feminist works of what people would probably call radical or extreme. A few favorites: Feminist Political Theory, Dirty Weekend, The End of Men, The Women’s Room, Det kallas manshat (English: It’s called hating men).

Well-written biographies. I don’t limit myself to people I know/like. I do prefer music bios about musicians I like, but I will read about just about anyone. At the same time, I’m quite particular when it comes to the quality of the writing. Which is unfortunate in this genre, as it tends to be a poorly written genre. And yes, I will immediately want to read if a reviewer says it’s a good bio. Can’t seem to learn that in general, reviewers and me don’t have the same idea of what constitutes a good bio. Examples: Scar tissue, The Heroin Diaries, It’s So Easy, The Long Hard Road out of Hell.

Books that put interesting historical figures (fictive or real) in new contexts. For example if you make up a story Karin Boye, or Medea. I know I’ve read several books like this but right now I can only remember Texts from Jane Eyre.

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